CGU Learning Outcomes and Student Success

CGU’s institutional learning outcomes identify what students know and are able to do once they successfully complete a degree. These outcomes represent a combination of knowledge, skills, abilities, and behaviors. Each program has additional program learning outcomes.

INSTITUTIONAL LEARNING OUTCOMES

  1. Graduates will demonstrate the core knowledge in their discipline.

    • Graduates will have knowledge of the core concepts, issues, and methods in their field.
  2. Graduates will engage in and/or conduct research and critical inquiry in the context of the discipline.

    • Graduates will engage in and conduct original research. Graduates will synthesize knowledge and use theory in the design and execution of research and practice.
  3. Graduates will exhibit effective communication and presentation skills.

    • Graduates will use relevant information, integrate constructive feedback, and present work to others in an appropriate and effective manner.
  4. Graduates will have the opportunity to develop transdisciplinary perspectives and method.

    • Graduates will have the opportunity to engage in transdisciplinary problem-centered research. Graduates will be encouraged to draw upon ideas and methods of multiple disciplines to create new, integrative, and transformative solutions.
  5. Graduates will have acquired career-specific skills.

    • Graduates will have the professional skills needed to advance chosen career goals. Depending on the chosen field, this may include instructional, pedagogical, leadership, artistic, and community outreach with organizations outside of academia.

Program Outcomes

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Click on the links below to jump to the learning outcomes for that program.


School of Arts and Humanities

MASTER OF ARTS AND DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY IN CULTURAL STUDIES

Core Competencies:

  1. Advanced knowledge of the field
  2. Research/Critical Inquiry
  3. Intersectional thinking and commitment to diversity
  4. Written, Visual and Oral Communication
  5. Information and Digital Literacy
  6. Professional Socialization

Student Learning Outcomes:

  1. Demonstrate knowledge of foundational and new research in Cultural Studies and its intersecting fields
  2. Evaluate the arguments, methods, political stakes, and historical and scholarly context of Cultural Studies scholarship and theory
  3. Demonstrate the ability to conduct research using primary and secondary Cultural Studies sources
  4. Explain analysis and research in oral and written form
  5. Design original scholarly projects using appropriate methodologies that builds on previous research and responds to current questions in the discipline

MASTER OF ARTS IN ENGLISH

Student Learning Outcomes:

  1. Graduates will demonstrate a satisfactory mastery of content
  2. Graduates will demonstrate competency in close reading, literary interpretation, and writing
  3. Graduates will demonstrate adequate reading knowledge of one foreign language and/or skills in digital humanities
  4. Graduates will be able to discuss a clear plan for post-MA future and is capable of planning its implementations

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY IN ENGLISH

Core Competencies:

  1. Advanced knowledge
  2. Research/Critical Inquiry
  3. Written, Visual and Oral Communication
  4. Professionalization

Program Outcomes:

  1. Training in diverse approaches to Anglophone literature: British, American, Transnational
  2. Expertise in the interpretation of text using theoretical approaches.
  3. Awareness of the modern development of literary study.
  4. Awareness of the rich and expanded objects/theories of literary study, including marginalized, overlooked and underrepresented groups in the professional field of Literature.
  5. Proficiency in critical thinking.
  6. Proficiency in the specialized writing required of scholarly literary writing. Focused attention paid also to clear, creative and engaging writing by practitioners in the scholarly fields of Literature.
  7. Proficiency and comfort in public speaking in the directed fields of discussing one’s scholarship and its relevance.
  8. Understanding of the skills/expertise/content mastered in a program of graduate Literary study and how these translate into professional fields both inside and outside academia.

MASTER OF ARTS AND DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY IN HISTORY

Core Competencies:

  1. Advanced Knowledge of Disparate Approaches to Historical Practice
  2. Research/Critical Inquiry
  3. Commitment to Representation of Diverse Voices and Comprehensive Representation of Historical Subjects in Historical Practice
  4. Written, Visual and Oral Communication
  5. Applied History Technique and Theory
  • Ethics
  • Information and Digital Literacy

MASTER OF ARTS IN ARCHIVAL STUDIES

Student Learning Outcomes:

  1. Students will develop skills in archives, organizing archival material, reading and deciphering old and illegible writing

MASTER OF ARTS IN APPLIED GENDER STUDIES

Student Learning Outcomes:

  1. Students will be able apply Feminist Research methodologies in their research
  2. Students will be able to understand relevant feminist theories that impact women globally
  3. Students will be able to understand and discuss the Violence Against Women’s Act and Legislation
  4. Students will be able to understand, write about and discuss  Global Gender Issues, especially violence against women, the Girl Child, and child marriage
  5. Students will be able to understand and discuss the Four World Conferences on Women, especially the Fourth conference in Beijing in 1965
  6. Students will be familiar with and able to discuss UN Women and the UN Commission on the Status of Women
  7. Students will be able to discuss gender issues across racial, religious, socio-economic, and sexual identities
  8. Students will be able to understand how non-profit organizations operate– how to work with a board, interns, fundraising for non-profits, PR

MASTER OF FINE ARTS

Core Competencies:

  1. A deep understanding of the media they choose to work with, including its history, conventions that have grown up around it, and social contexts in which these elements play out today – as well as a “conversant” understanding of the same in media other than their chosen media
  2. Knowledge of the critical language surrounding art, its production, and reception especially as these relate to socially engaged practices.
  3. A broad understanding of the “artworld” that shapes and are shaped by contemporary art-making practices: including the global art market, foundations, non-profits, universities, art schools, residencies, public art patronage, artist-run spaces, underground enterprises, DIY start ups, and alternative ventures
  4. Proficiency in creating a syllabus, leading a discussion group, and organizing material, both textual and visual, in a format that elicits critical dialogue
  5. A strong knowledge of how to manage one’s own practices, whether that involves making objects in a studio, creating ephemeral events, digitally transmitting imagery, or collaborating with other artists, scientists, scholars, or social groups. In every case, to be able to pursue one’s vision because of the real-world foundation upon which artistic and creative vision is built.

Student Learning Outcomes:

With an MFA in Art from CGU graduates can…

  1. Make art.
  2. Articulate personal and professional commitments and priorities as artists.
  3. Present exhibitions of own works and those made by other artists.
  4. Lead and actively participate in critical discussion groups.
  5. Engage contemporary art and its contexts in a subtle and supple manner.
  6. Work with curators, critics, scholars, activists and other artists on collaborative projects.
  7. Have a generative impact on the communities they choose to engage.

MASTER OF ARTS IN MUSIC

DOCTOR OF CHURCH MUSIC

DOCTOR OF MUSICAL ARTS

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY IN MUSICOLOGY

Student Learning Outcomes:

  1. Reading knowledge of one or two languages, with special regard to writings on musical subjects
  2. Competency in subject areas covered, oral expression skills, writing skills, and knowledge and facility in the field, appropriate to the degree sought by the student
  3. Ability to compose and perform musical work

Core Competencies:

  1. Advanced knowledge of the field
  2. Research/Critical Inquiry
  3. Intersectional Thinking and Commitment to Diversity
  4. Written, Visual and Oral Communication
  5. Information and Digital Literacy
  6. Professional Socialization
  7. Musical Performance Skills

MASTER OF ARTS IN ISLAMIC STUDIES

Student Learning Outcomes:

  1. To provide students with a broad knowledge of Islam, its scripture and tradition, its legal theory, philosophy, theology, mysticism, gender relations, and history (classical, medieval, and modern), in the comparative context with other religions (Christianity and Judaism),
  2. To prepare students for doctoral studies in Islam and other related areas, and
  3. To enable students to articulate their knowledge of Islam in effective oral and written communication

MASTER OF ARTS IN WOMEN’S AND GENDER STUDIES, RELIGION

Student Learning Outcomes:

  1. To introduce students to global feminist scholarship in the field of religion
  2. To prepare them for doctoral studies in Women’s Studies in Religion and other related areas
  3. To enable students to articulate their knowledge of the field in effective oral and written communication

MASTER OF ARTS IN RELIGION, GENERAL

Core Competencies:

  1. Research & Methods. REL students who qualify to graduate with the MA in Religion have mastered (have engaged with) the content of primary texts (usually in translation), are able to evaluate scholarly research on texts, can demonstrate understanding of the state of the several subfields of the study of Religion, and can also “translate” the research methods and tools used in such study and analysis to a post-graduate professional or academic world.
  2. Theories & Conceptual Frameworks. REL students who graduate with the MA are able to apply theory to conceptually explore, analyze and explain ideas.
  3. REL students who graduate with the MA are effective, engaging, and elegant communicators.
  4. Professional Socialization. REL students who graduate with the MA have taken responsibility for their own professional path, understanding their goals, exploring broad opportunities to employ their skills and learning in a variety of professional and academic settings, and seeking mentorship wisely and appropriately.

Student Learning Outcomes:

  1. To provide students with a broad and general knowledge of religion in three areas in which the School of Religion offers the Ph.D.
  2. To prepare them for specialized doctoral study of religion
  3. Enable them to articulate that knowledge in effective oral and written communication

MASTER OF ARTS IN RELIGION AND AMERICAN POLITICS, INTERFIELD PROGRAM WITH SPE

Student Learning Outcomes:

  1. A solid understanding of the academic foundations of two fields, North American religions and American politics, and their historical interactions
  2. The requisite skills necessary for doing research
  3. Skills to work in academic or professional settings

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY IN RELIGION

Doctoral Pre-Dissertation Core Competencies:

  1. Research & Methods. Religion students who are ready to move to the dissertation stage have mastered [have command of] primary sources and texts in their fields or subfields, are able to evaluate scholarly research, have done the necessary work to ascertain the current state of the fields encompassing Religion and Religious Studies, and thus are prepared to conduct relevant, original research that addresses the needs of those fields and subfields utilizing appropriate methods.
  2. Theories & Conceptual Frameworks. Religion students who are ready to move to the dissertation stage use and apply appropriate theories to explore, analyze, and explain ideas and/or phenomena.
  3. Religion students who are ready to move to the dissertation stage are effective and engaging communicators.
  4. History & Foundations. Religion students who are ready to move to the dissertation stage are trained in the foundational history and context within which the field (and its subfields) emerged and evolved. They are able to query and critique the ‘givens’ and categories of this foundational history.
  5. Professional Socialization. Religion students who move to the dissertation stage take responsibility for their own professional path, understanding their goals, exploring broad opportunities to employ their skills and learning in a variety of professional settings, and setting effective timelines for completion of post-course work and dissertation writing.

Student Learning Outcomes:

  1. To acquire an expert knowledge appropriate to the doctoral level of the phenomenon of religion in some of its diverse aspects as determined by one’s area of specialization, such as different traditions (Judaism, Islam, Christianity, etc.), different approaches (sociological, historical, philosophical, theological, etc.), and different contexts (globalization, comparative, African, etc.);
  2. To contribute new knowledge by means of significant and original research on some aspects of religion;
  3. To effectively communicate the results of one’s research both orally and in writing

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Botany Program

MASTER OF SCIENCE AND DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY IN BOTANY

Program Competencies:

Our graduates have acquired the professional “life skills” necessary for success:

  1. They have experience and knowledge in the use of the herbarium as a research tool and understand its importance to botanical science
  2. They have developed skills in library research, both in situ and in silico for developing a broader understanding of their research, including the use of archives
  3. They have had considerable practice giving public presentations on their work, they know how to organize a talk, how to design slides that clearly communicate, how to field questions from the audience
  4. They have had considerable practice in the preparation of grant proposals and in the management of research monies from multiple sources. They understand the importance of thanking donors to their scientific pursuits
  5. They have been inculcated with the importance of completing projects, of bringing research to fruition in the form of publication; their scientific writing skills have been honed, they have learned to be their own most critical and insightful critics

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Master’s: Graduates of the CALBG (CGU) master’s program in Floristic Botany are excellent field biologists. They show excellence in the design and execution of floristic research. They are undaunted and capable in field biology and are comfortable with four-wheel drive, cross-country hiking, specimen collection and preparation, and use of GPS/GIS. They display a professional level of skill in working with herbarium specimens and in plant identification. They know how to manage data and understand the importance of tracking data sources.
  2. Doctoral: Graduates of the CALBG (CGU) doctoral program in Botany understand and have internalized the scientific method as it applies to comparative biology. They are the world’s expert on the group that is the focus of their Ph.D. research; they know these plants at the ‘whole plant’ level as well as at the levels required to collect and manipulate the data they work with (e.g., DNA, anatomy). Depending upon their plant group and interests, they have in-depth knowledge of related fields (e.g., ecology, physiology, biogeography) sufficient to operate as researchers ‘bridging’ these fields and plant systematics.
  3. All of our graduates are knowledgeable plant biologists: they understand how plants are built, they understand life cycles, they can look at a cross section / radial section, etc. of most any plant part and have a good idea as to what they are seeing.
  4. All of our graduates are knowledgeable evolutionary biologists: they possess an understanding of evolutionary theory, models of speciation, macroevolution, and of complexity at the population–species interface.
  5. All of our graduates understand phylogenetics: they know the historical roots of our discipline, understand the theoretical underpinnings of phylogenetics, and have a good handle on current cutting-edge methods. They think phylogenetically. Our Ph.D. graduates are master users of phylogenetic methods.

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Center for Business and Management in the Arts (CBMA)

MASTER OF ARTS IN ARTS MANAGEMENT

MASTER OF ARTS IN ART BUSINESS

MASTER OF ARTS IN ART BUSINESS AND INFORMATION SYSTEMS AND TECHNOLOGY (INTERFIELD DEGREE)

Program Competencies:

Graduates of CBMArts master’s programs acquire competence in the following domains specific to the U.S. arts and cultural sector:

  1. Financial and accounting literacy in both nonprofit and commercial contexts
  2. Knowledge of the distinct organizational and commercial dynamics that shape arts institutions and businesses
  3. Planning and execution strategies for generating contributed and earned revenue
  4. Understanding of the legal, ethical, and policy environments for the arts
  5. Management of complex and diverse organizational environments, including boards, leadership, staff, and artists and other creative talents
  6. Navigating local, national, and international contexts for the arts
  7. The application of diverse research methods and data analysis, synthesis and evaluation
  8. Identifying, analyzing, and developing solutions to systemic challenges and inequities at both the sector and societal levels

Graduates of CBMArts Master’s programs acquire competence in the following areas of professional readiness:

  1. Designing and presenting clear, informative, and persuasive written, oral, and visual communications tailored to audiences and stakeholders
  2. Working within as well as leading teams
  3. Building and maintaining professional networks and productive working relationships for the purposes of both organizational and career advancement
  4. Navigating explicit and implicit professional hierarchies both interpersonally as well as within and between organizations
  5. Demonstrating curiosity about and respect for diverse cultural traditions and contexts

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School of Community and Global Health

MASTER OF PUBLIC HEALTH

Foundational Competencies and Learning Outcomes:

There are eight domains with 22 competency statements. By graduation, all students should be able to:

Evidence-based Approaches to Public Health

Competency/Learning Outcome

  1. Apply epidemiological methods to the breadth of settings and situations in public health practice
  2. Select quantitative and qualitative data collection methods appropriate for a given public health context
  3. Analyze quantitative and qualitative data using biostatistics, informatics, computer-based programming and software, as appropriate
  4. Interpret results of data analysis for public health research, policy or practice

Public Health & Health Care Systems

Competency/Learning Outcome

  1. Compare the organization, structure and function of health care, public health and regulatory systems across national and international settings
  2. Discuss the means by which structural bias, social inequities and racism undermine health and create challenges to achieving health equity at organizational, community and societal levels

Planning & Management to Promote Health

Competency/Learning Outcome

  1. Assess population needs, assets and capacities that affect communities’ health
  2. Apply awareness of cultural values and practices to the design or implementation of public health policies or programs
  3. Design a population-based policy, program, project or intervention
  4. Explain basic principles and tools of budget and resource management
  5. Select methods to evaluate public health programs

Policy in Public Health

Competency/Learning Outcome

  1. Discuss multiple dimensions of the policy-making process, including the roles of ethics and evidence
  2. Propose strategies to identify stakeholders and build coalitions and partnerships for influencing public health outcomes
  3. Advocate for political, social or economic policies and programs that will improve health in diverse populations
  4. Evaluate policies for their impact on public health and health equity

Leadership

Competency/Learning Outcome

  1. Apply principles of leadership, governance and management, which include creating a vision, empowering others, fostering collaboration and guiding decision making
  2. Apply negotiation and mediation skills to address organizational or community challenges

Communication

Competency/Learning Outcome

  1. Select communication strategies for different audiences and sectors
  2. Communicate audience-appropriate public health content, both in writing and through oral presentation
  3. Describe the importance of cultural competence in communicating public health content

Interprofessional Practice

Competency/Learning Outcome

  1. Perform effectively on interprofessional teams

Systems Thinking

Competency/Learning Outcome

  1. Apply systems thinking tools to a public health issue

DOCTOR OF PUBLIC HEALTH

Foundational Competencies and Learning Outcomes:

There are four domains and 20 competency statements. By graduation, all students should be able to:

Data & Analysis

Competency/Learning Outcome

  1. Explain qualitative, quantitative, mixed methods and policy analysis research and evaluation methods to address health issues at multiple (individual, group, organization, community and population) levels
  2. Design a qualitative, quantitative, mixed methods, policy analysis or evaluation project to address a public health issue
  3. Explain the use and limitations of surveillance systems and national surveys in assessing, monitoring and evaluating policies and programs and to address a population’s health

Leadership, Management & Governance

Competency/Learning Outcome

  1. Propose strategies for health improvement and elimination of health inequities by organizing stakeholders, including researchers, practitioners, community leaders and other partners
  2. Communicate public health science to diverse stakeholders, including individuals at all levels of health literacy, for purposes of influencing behavior and policies
  3. Integrate knowledge, approaches, methods, values and potential contributions from multiple professions and systems in addressing public health problems
  4. Create a strategic plan
  5. Facilitate shared decision making through negotiation and Consensus-building methods
  6. Create organizational change strategies
  7. Propose strategies to promote inclusion and equity within public health programs, policies and systems
  8. Assess one’s own strengths and weaknesses in leadership capacities, including cultural proficiency
  9. Propose human, fiscal and other resources to achieve a strategic goal
  10. Cultivate new resources and revenue streams to achieve a strategic goal

Policy & Programs

Competency/Learning Outcome

  1. Design a system-level intervention to address a public health issue
  2. Integrate knowledge of cultural values and practices in the design of public health policies and programs
  3. Integrate scientific information, legal and regulatory approaches, ethical frameworks and varied stakeholder interests in policy development and analysis
  4. Propose interprofessional team approaches to improving public health

Education and Workforce Development

Competency/Learning Outcome

  1. Assess an audience’s knowledge and learning needs
  2. Deliver training or educational experiences that promote learning in academic, organizational or community settings
  3. Use best practice modalities in pedagogical practices

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY IN HEALTH PROMOTION SCIENCES

Competency 1:  Conceptualize ethical research in health promotion sciences that is based on advanced knowledge of research methods and a comprehensive understanding of current research

Student Learning Outcomes:

  1. Locate, review, critically analyze, and synthesize existing research in health promotion sciences
  2. Identify, select, and implement or propose, develop and evaluate reliable and valid measurement instruments
  3. Apply an understanding of ethical issues relevant to studies of human populations to mentored, team-based and or independent research projects
  4. Develop and articulate research questions in the form of testable hypotheses, and design and implement research on the determinants of health behavior based on a solid understanding of study designs

Competency 2:  Develop health education and promotion projects that are grounded in fundamental theories of behavior change

Student Learning Outcomes:

  1. Explain and compare major theories and models of health behavior change including their strengths and weaknesses
  2. Apply theories in health promotion sciences to the formulation of research questions, development of health promotion strategies, evaluation of existing programs, or design of new behavioral interventions

Competency 3: Conduct analyses of data in the health promotion sciences using statistical methods

Student Learning Outcomes:

  1. Explain available statistical procedures for different applications in health promotion sciences research
  2. Utilize appropriate statistical methods to conduct analyses of health behavior data and interpret results from analyses

Competency 4: Develop knowledge in a specialty area complementary to the health promotion sciences

Student Learning Outcome:

  1. Integrate knowledge from a core concentration into the understanding and application of research design, measurement, theory and statistical analysis

Competency 5: Clearly articulate information using communication skills suitable to the topic, purpose and audience

Student Learning Outcome:

  1. Communicate, discuss and defend research findings in written and oral formats such as through publishable manuscripts in peer-reviewed journals and at professional conferences

Competency 6: Teach with an awareness of pedagogical theory and through co-creating pedagogical principles that transcend disciplinary teaching and learning cultures

Student Learning Outcomes:

  1. Plan and implement academic lessons through creating course content and providing lectures in diverse educational contexts
  2. Reflect on and improve teaching toward the development of agile, ethical leadership of learning

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN HEALTH INFORMATION SYSTEMS AND TECHNOLOGY

Student Learning Outcomes:

  1. Apply epidemiological methods to the breadth of settings and situations in public health practice
  2. Select quantitative and qualitative data collection methods appropriate for a given public health context
  3. Analyze quantitative and qualitative data using biostatistics, informatics, computer-based programming and software, as appropriate
  4. Interpret results of data analysis for public health research, policy or practice
  5. Compare the organization, structure and function of health care, public health and regulatory systems across national and international settings
  6. Apply core knowledge of information systems and technology to various settings and contexts in the healthcare domain.
  7. Select information technologies and systems practices to improve healthcare delivery and management
  8. Design/construct algorithms to model complex data using machine learning and/or location intelligence and spatial analysis and/or mobile applications
  9. Implement information systems and technology solutions to healthcare business requirements such as cybersecurity risk management
  10. Perform effectively on interprofessional teams

MASTER OF ARTS IN POSITIVE HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY

Student Learning Outcomes:

  1. Describe how social, behavioral, environmental, and biological factors contribute to specific individual and community health outcomes.
  2. In collaboration with others, prioritize individual, organizational, and community concerns and resources for public health programs.
  3. Consider the role of cultural, social, and behavioral factors in the accessibility, availability, acceptability, and delivery of public health services
  4. Describe the role of governmental and non-governmental organizations in the delivery of community health services
  5. Apply the basic public health sciences (including, but not limited to biostatistics, epidemiology, environmental health sciences, health services administration, and social and behavioral health sciences) to public health policies and programs
  6. Conduct a comprehensive review of scientific evidence related to a public health issue, concern, or intervention
  7. Interpret the organizational structures, functions, and authorities of local, state, and federal public health agencies for public health program management
  8. Incorporate ethical standards of practice as the basis of all interactions with organizations, communities, and persons

CERTIFICATE IN THE FOUNDATIONS OF PUBLIC HEALTH

Student Learning Outcomes:

  1. Assess the health status of populations and their related determinants of health and illness (e.g., factors contributing to health promotion and disease prevention, availability and use of health services)
  2. Develop a plan to implement policies and programs
    Communicate in writing and orally, in person, and through electronic means with linguistic and cultural proficiency
  3. Consider the role of cultural, social, and behavioral factors in the accessibility, availability, acceptability, and delivery of public health services
  4. Describe the role of governmental and non-governmental organizations in the delivery of community health services
  5. Apply the basic public health sciences (including, but not limited to biostatistics, epidemiology, environmental health sciences, health services administration, and social and behavioral health sciences) to public health policies and programs
  6. Conduct a comprehensive review of scientific evidence related to a public health issue, concern, or intervention
  7. Interpret the organizational structures, functions, and authorities of local, state, and federal public health agencies for public health program management
  8. Incorporate ethical standards of practice as the basis of all interactions with organizations, communities, and persons

CERTIFICATE IN RESEARCH PRACTICE FOR HEALTH PROFESSIONALS

Student Learning Outcomes:

  1. Select quantitative and qualitative data collection methods appropriate for a given health context
  2. Analyze quantitative and qualitative data using biostatistics, informatics, computer-based programming and software, as appropriate
  3. Interpret results of data analysis for health research, policy or practice
  4. Select methods to evaluate health programs
  5. Apply proper terminology and definitions used in biostatistics and epidemiology
  6. Identify key sources of data for biostatistical and epidemiologic studies
  7. Apply appropriate measurement scales, concepts of probability, random variation, and commonly used statistical probability distributions
  8. Apply descriptive techniques and commonly used inferential statistical methods to summarize health data
  9. Describe preferred methodological alternatives to commonly used statistical methods when assumptions are not met.
  10. Explain the importance of biostatistics and epidemiology for informing scientific, ethical, economic and political discussion of health issues.
  11. Comprehend ethical and legal principles pertaining to the collection, maintenance, use and dissemination of data and other health information
  12. Interpret, articulate, and critique results of statistical and epidemiological analyses found in health studies
  13. Develop written and oral presentation based on epidemiological students and statistical analyses for both health professionals and educated lay audiences, and prepare manuscripts for the peer-reviewed literature

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Peter F. Drucker and Masatoshi Ito Graduate School of Management

MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

Core Competencies:

  1. Core Knowledge: Demonstrate core knowledge in management. Identify, research, develop and implement plans to address specific issues that impact business strategy and organizational functioning.
  2. Critical Thinking and Inquiry: Demonstrate fundamental skills of analytical reasoning, evaluating data, and decision-making, as well as moral and ethical considerations.
  3. Self-management and Teamwork: Identify personal strengths, values, and challenges and develop methods to effectively manage professional behavior and relationships in teams and organizations.
  4. Communication and Presentation Skills: Use relevant information, integrate feedback, and present work in an effective way.
  5. Transdisciplinary Perspectives and Method: Draw upon ideas and methods of multiple disciplines, as appropriate to create new, integrative solutions.

Student Learning Outcomes:

  1. Drucker Principles: Students will understand and be able to use foundational Drucker Principles
  2. Analysis and Decision Making: Students will possess the quantitative skills that are fundamental to making decisions within an organization.
  3. People and Strategy: Students will be able to think strategically in addressing challenges.

FLEX MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

Core Competencies:

  1. Core Knowledge: Demonstrate core knowledge in management. Identify, research, develop and implement plans to address specific issues that impact business strategy and organizational functioning. Make business and organizational decisions based on the unique needs, values, culture, and position of a company.
  2. Critical Thinking and Inquiry: Demonstrate fundamental skills of analytical reasoning, evaluating data, and decision-making, as well as moral and ethical considerations.
  3. Self-management and Teamwork: Identify personal strengths, values, and challenges and develop methods to effectively manage professional behavior and relationships in teams and organizations.
  4. Communication and Presentation Skills: Use relevant information, integrate feedback, and present work in an effective and compelling way.
  5. Transdisciplinary Perspectives and Method: Draw upon ideas and methods of multiple disciplines, as appropriate to create new, integrative solutions.

Student Learning Outcomes:

  1. Drucker Principles: Students will understand and be able to use foundational Drucker Principles
  2. Analysis and Decision Making: Students will possess the quantitative skills that are fundamental to making decisions within an organization.
  3. People and Strategy: Students will be able to think strategically in addressing challenges.

MASTER OF ARTS IN MANAGEMENT (MAM)

Core Competencies:

  1. Core Knowledge: Demonstrate core knowledge in management. Identify, research, develop and implement plans to address specific issues that impact business strategy and organizational functioning.
  2. Critical Thinking and Inquiry: Demonstrate fundamental skills of analytical reasoning, evaluating data, and decision-making, as well as moral and ethical considerations.
  3. Self-management and Teamwork: Identify personal strengths, values, and challenges and develop methods to effectively manage professional behavior and relationships in teams and organizations.
  4. Communication and Presentation Skills: Collaborate with and manage team interactions to create and present project results in an effective way.
  5. Transdisciplinary Perspectives and Method: Draw upon ideas and methods of multiple disciplines, as appropriate to create new, integrative solutions.

Student Learning Outcomes:

  1. Drucker Principles: Students will understand and be able to use foundational Drucker Principles [For students electing Drucker Philosophy course]
  2. Marketing Planning: Students will understand and be able to use foundational Marketing Concepts [For students electing Marketing Management course]
  3. Analysis and Decision Making: Students will possess the quantitative skills that are fundamental to making decisions within an organization.
  4. Concentration: Students will understand and be able to use foundational principle of their chosen area of concentration.

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN FINANCE

Core Competencies:

  1. Core knowledge: Demonstrate core knowledge in finance. Draw upon ideas and methods of multiple disciplines within and outside of Finance, as appropriate.
  2. Quantitative capability: Perform analysis of finance problems, using a range of quantitative models and methodologies.
  3. Communication: Use relevant information, integrate feedback, and present work in an effective way.

Student Learning Outcomes:

  1. Students will understand and be able to use fundamental financial knowledge and mathematical models.
  2. Students will be able to understand and apply quantitative models and methodology in the analysis of complex financial problems.
  3. Students will be able to communicate clearly and effectively in professional financial environments.

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN FINANCIAL ENGINEERING

Core Competencies:

  1. Core knowledge: Demonstrate core knowledge in financial engineering. Draw upon ideas and methods of multiple disciplines within and outside of Finance, as appropriate.
  2. Quantitative capability: Perform analysis of financial engineering problems, using a range of quantitative models and methodologies.
  3. Communication: Use relevant information, integrate feedback, and present work in an effective way.

Student Learning Outcomes:

  1. Students will understand and be able to use fundamental financial knowledge and mathematical models.
  2. Students will be able to understand and apply quantitative models and methodology in the analysis of complex financial problems.
  3. Students will be able to implement models numerically using various tools.

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY IN MANAGEMENT

Core Competencies:

  1. Core knowledge: Demonstrate core knowledge in management. Draw upon ideas and methods of multiple disciplines, as appropriate. Formulate research questions to address significant topics and issues in management.
  2. Research, methods, and analysis: Conduct research and critical inquiry in the context of management and, as appropriate, other disciplines. Identify and employ appropriate research procedures to conduct significant, original research.
  3. Communication: Use relevant information, integrate feedback, and present work in an effective way. Communicate in English the results of original research with scientific peers in management and related disciplines.
  4. Pedagogy: Communicate research results to a range of audiences in a variety of oral and written presentation formats. Teach effectively in venues such as lectures, classroom demonstrations, group projects, and small group discussions.

Student Learning Outcomes:

  1. Graduates will understand and be able to use foundational Drucker Principles while applying the knowledge learned from their elective classes.
  2. Graduates will possess research skills that will enable them to contribute to academia and the general field of management.
  3. Graduates will be able to communicate effectively and articulate the school’s integrated approach to management.
  4. Graduates will contribute publications to their field of research.

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School of Educational Studies

MASTER OF ARTS IN EDUCATION

Student Learning Outcomes:

  1. Graduates demonstrate core knowledge of educational and community organizations
  2. Graduates apply principles of diversity, social change, and immigration in their educational environment.
  3.  Graduates demonstrate knowledge of research and assessment methods
  4. Graduates are able to think analytically and creatively
  5. Graduates demonstrate good writing, communication, and presentation skills

MASTER OF ARTS IN TEACHER EDUCATION

Student Learning Outcomes:

  1. General Education candidates will be able to meet the thirteen California Teaching Performance Expectations (TPEs) as demonstrated through their clinical teaching requirements and passing scores of 3 or 4 on the California Teaching Performance Assessments (TPAs), Tasks 1-4. Our Education Specialist candidates will be able to meet the California Professional Standards for Education Specialists as demonstrated through their clinical teaching requirements.
  2. All candidates will be able to apply research-based strategies to create and support a classroom focused on high academic expectations for all students as demonstrated via formal observations and evaluation of their clinical practice and lesson planning.
  3. All candidates will be able to analyze student achievement individually and collectively in order to scrutinize their performance as a teacher and guide their own professional growth as demonstrated through their clinical practice and a required “Action Plan for Professional Growth” assignment.
  4. Candidates will be able to write a graduate-level, practitioner-based research paper (e.g., the Ethnographic Narrative Project) that integrates their teaching experiences and knowledge of their students, families, communities, and school cultures with scholarly research to guide their growth and reflection as a teacher.

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY IN EDUCATION

Student Learning Outcomes:

  1. Graduates have expertise in both theories and research in education
  2. Graduates demonstrate a thorough knowledge of diversity in education
  3. Graduates comprehend and can conduct policy studies
  4. Graduates conduct original research in education
  5. Graduates conduct assessment studies
  6. Graduates teach and make presentations about their research
  7. Graduates write articles about and publish their research

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY IN EDUCATION, OFFERED JOINTLY WITH SAN DIEGO STATE UNIVERSITY

Student Learning Outcomes:

  1. Graduates have expertise in both theories and research in education
  2. Graduates demonstrate a thorough knowledge of diversity in education
  3. Graduates understand and can conduct policy studies
  4. Graduates engage in systemic organizational change that improves performance and quality of life for all
  5. Graduates apply theory and research-based knowledge to transform communities
  6. Graduates use effective educational practices, including tools available through technology, to transform organizations
  7. Graduates conduct original research in education
  8. Graduates conduct assessment studies
  9. Graduates teach and make presentations about their research
  10. Graduates write articles about and publish their research

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Center for Information Systems and Technology

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN HEALTH INFORMATION MANAGEMENT

Student Learning Outcomes:

  1. Graduates are prepared to be able to lead HIM projects
  2. Graduates have core HIM knowledge, as informed by organizations, such as AHIMA
  3. Graduates can integrate HIM & health-care foundations
  4. Graduates have perspective on health care and real world
  5. Graduates have communication, interpersonal, and team skills
  6. Graduates are able to think analytically and creatively

MASTERS OF SCIENCE IN INFORMATION SYSTEMS AND TECHNOLOGY

Student Learning Outcomes:

  1. Graduates are prepared to be able to lead system development (or similar) projects
  2. Graduates have core IS knowledge, as informed by the MSIS 2006 model curriculum
  3. Graduates can integrate IS & business foundations
  4. Graduates have perspective on business and practice
  5. Graduates have communication, interpersonal, and team skills
  6. Graduates are able to think analytically and creatively

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY IN INFORMATION SYSTEMS AND TECHNOLOGY

Student Learning Outcomes:

  1. Graduates have expertise in an IST topic area
  2. Graduates can teach in their area
  3. Graduates can review research in their area
  4. Graduates can conduct research that contributes to their area
  5. Graduates can make presentations about their research
  6. Graduates can write articles about their research

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Institute of Mathematical Sciences

MASTER OF ARTS AND MASTER OF SCIENCE IN MATHEMATICS

Student Learning Outcomes:

  1. Students should be able to formulate and execute effective problem-solving strategies (for graduate-level mathematics problems)
  2. Students should be able to effectively articulate concepts from graduate level mathematics to an audience of colleagues and students of mathematics
  3. Students should be competent doing advanced numerical calculations and modeling using high level computing language
  4. Students should be able to apply knowledge of advanced mathematics in practical and real problem solving situations

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY IN MATHEMATICS

Student Learning Outcomes:

  1. Students should be able to formulate and execute effective problem-solving strategies (for graduate-level mathematics problems)
  2. Students should be able to effectively articulate concepts from graduate level mathematics to an audience of colleagues and students of mathematics
  3. Students should be competent doing advanced numerical calculations and modeling using high level computing language
  4. Students should be able to formulate and conduct original research in graduate level mathematics
  5. Students should be able to apply knowledge of advanced mathematics in practical and real problem solving situations

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School of Social Science, Policy, and Evaluation

MASTER OF ARTS IN ECONOMICS

MASTER OF ARTS IN GLOBAL COMMERCE AND FINANCE

MASTER OF ARTS IN INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL ECONOMY

MASTER OF ARTS IN INTERNATIONAL STUDIES

MASTER OF ARTS IN POLITICAL SCIENCE

Student Learning Outcomes for all concentrations:

  1. A solid understanding of the academic foundations of the field.
  2. Requisite skills necessary to understand and do quality research within the field.
  3. Skills to work in academic or professional settings.

Discipline Specific Knowledge:

  1. Demonstrate a solid understanding of the main sub-fields of study within field.
    • *Each concentration has specific elements in addition to those shown above.

MASTER OF ARTS IN PSYCHOLOGY

Student Learning Outcomes:

  1. Comprehend and apply critical theory and empirical research in concentration area
  2. Facility with statistical and methodological techniques commonly used in one’s concentration area
  3. Development of professional writing and oral presentation skills
  4. Ability to understand and apply multiple perspectives in the field of program evaluation

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

Student Learning Outcomes:

  1. Ability to understand and apply the principles of Human Resource (HR) Strategy
  2. Ability to understand and apply strategic solutions to a variety of complex business issues
  3. Development of effective communication and oral presentation skills

MASTER OF ARTS IN POSITIVE HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY

Student Learning Outcomes:

  1. Describe how social, behavioral, environmental, and biological factors contribute to specific individual and community health outcomes.
  2. In collaboration with others, prioritize individual, organizational, and community concerns and resources for public health programs.
  3. Identify the causes of social and behavioral factors that affect health of individuals and populations.
  4. Identify basic theories, concepts and models from a range of social and behavioral disciplines that are used in public health research and practice.
  5. Differentiate among goals, measurable objectives, related activities, and expected outcomes for a public health program.
  6. Apply ethical principles to public health programming, implementation and evaluation
  7. Specify multiple targets and levels of intervention for social and behavior sciences programs and/or policies
  8. Identify individual, organizational concerns, assets, resources and deficits for social and behavioral science interventions
  9. Apply evidence based approaches in the development and evaluation of social and behavioral science interventions
  10. Describe the merits and social and behavioral science interventions and policies
  11. Describe steps and procedures for the planning, implementation and evaluation of public health programs, policies and interventions
  12. Identify critical stakeholders for the planning, implementation and evaluation of public health policies and interventions
  13. Compute descriptive and simple inferential statistics appropriate for the data and research questions in positive health psychology
  14. Select research methods to evaluate positive health psychology programs

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY IN ECONOMICS

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY IN INTERNATIONAL POLITICS AND POLITICAL SCIENCE

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY IN POLITICAL SCIENCE

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY IN PSYCHOLOGY

Pre-Dissertation Competencies:

OVERVIEW OF FIVE CORE AREAS OF COMPETENCY

Research & Methods. SSSPE students are able to evaluate the rigor of research conducted by others and are prepared to create relevant, ethical research of professional and societal value utilizing appropriate methods.

  1. They are critical consumers of academic and applied research. They critique the quality, rigor, and relevance of academic and practice-based articles. This involves understanding and recognizing quantitative and qualitative methods and reasoning; identifying the types of research questions best suited to various methodologies; articulating the rigor of the research by speaking to validity and reliability; and citing the strengths and limitations of utilized research methods.  This also involves understanding the “state of the science,” recognizing bias, addressing issues with sample and/or data gathering, identifying unstated limitations, and spotting problematic conclusions and/or generalizations.
  2. They have developed the prerequisite skills necessary to produce high-quality, worthwhile research. They have demonstrated their ability to choose and implement appropriate research designs, strategies, and techniques to answer specific research questions that are of professional and societal value. This involves aligning conceptual frameworks, research questions and methods; identifying suitable research participants; collecting, cleaning and coding data; inspecting the quality of data and applying techniques to strengthen meaning and usefulness; selecting and applying appropriate empirical methods; presenting findings in a coherent manner; drawing appropriate conclusions and generalizations; and presenting/sharing one’s work in an engaging manner.
  3. They demonstrate foundational understanding of ethics in research and data privacy. They understand and apply best and ethical practices with respect to conducting research and distributing research results including: relationship between researcher and study participants, using appropriate analytical tools, adhering to best practices with respect to data privacy, confidentiality & security when doing research involving human subjects and/or other forms of data sampling or collection.

Theories & Conceptual Frameworks. SSSPE students use and apply theories to conceptually explore, analyze and explain situations, trends and/or phenomena.

  1. They analyze problems, contexts, trends and issues in light of theories and conceptual frameworks related to research and practice and policy & evaluation as well as interdisciplinary perspectives. They explore how different situations can be conceptually understood through a theoretical lens; cite and critique seminal texts related to specific theories; understand that theories are not “truths” per se, but rather postulations and that empirical research can be used to support or refute the applicability of a theory to a specific context. They develop the ability to synthesize different perspectives to ground and inform the research or applied project.

Communication. SSSPE students are effective communicators.

  1. They are strong writers. In a manner appropriate for the audience at hand, they write clear, compelling, original, and evidence-based pieces that use a strong professional or scholarly voice, standard writing conventions, proper attributions, and appropriate sources and citations to support a thesis or argument. Students appreciate the demands of tailoring communication to various audiences, and an awareness of the importance of diverse media, including briefs, vlogs, blogs, podcasts, newsletters, Ted Talks, technical reports, etc.
  2. They author effective literature reviews that showcase their expertise in the field. They write clear, coherent, purposeful literature reviews that synthesize, categorize, interpret and critique literature to advance a claim or argument about the state of a field or area of study.  This involves the ability to select appropriate literature and identify themes and issues across seminal texts. Also involves paraphrasing and citing sources effectively and in accordance to the rules of a specific manual of style (typically APA).
  3. They are effective oral presenters. They clearly, coherently and purposefully present oral arguments, research, and data using visual and textual aids as appropriate. They can adapt their messaging and their aids to different audiences, ranging from academic to applied to translational contexts.

Diversity, Equity & Inclusion. SSSPE students advance the mission of CGU by working to improve society through science, enhancing individual & community well-being.

They use empirical evidence and their knowledge of critical theory and research to enhance individuals, organizations, and communities.  This involves identifying/critiquing barriers to achievement for historically marginalized groups and identifying/critiquing measures taken to mitigate or nullify those barriers.  In many cases, this analysis also involves identifying specific organizational policies that relate to access, equity, and/or inclusion.  One need not approach from a deficit lens but could also approach from an asset-based frame and focus on the contributions, resiliency, and success of specific programs, organizations, and populations.

Professional Socialization. SSSPE students take responsibility for their own professional path and effectively position/market themselves with their goals in mind.

  1. They articulate their professional qualifications and aspirations with clarity and have developed and implemented individual plans to achieve their goals. This involves self-assessing one’s strengths and weaknesses, articulating the intrinsic purpose, scope and value of a PhD, and developing plans in light of one’s aspirations to capitalize on their strengths and shore up undeveloped areas.  In most cases, it involves identifying and developing competencies and skillsets that are unique to one’s own professional goals.
  2. They work well with others. This involves collaborating effectively on projects, giving and receiving constructive feedback; advancing discussions when articulating persuasive arguments; and assuming the posture of a “humble expert.”
  3. They introduce and present themselves effectively to showcase their expertise and make themselves contenders for their careers of choice. This involves speaking about one’s experiences and skillsets as well as preparing materials that highlight one’s interests, skillsets, experiences, and strengths.

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