Spring 2023


TNDY 408U – Data Privacy Through a Global Legal Lens

Instructor: Adriana Sanford, Senior Research Fellow, Drucker School of Management
Term: Full
Section: 1
Units: 4
Instruction Mode: Online
Schedule: Tuesday/Thursday, 6:00 – 7:30PM

The practice of cybersecurity and data privacy laws continues to develop and mature as executive-level managers, corporate counsel, and corporate boards struggle to become familiar with the subject matter. Gain a broad understanding of the breadth and importance of the privacy field and its impact on U.S. businesses.

This course focuses on the evolution of privacy (i.e., encryption explosion, bulk data retention, electronic gag orders), as well as the privacy issues related to government surveillance and national security issues. This course also summarizes the essential provisions (and new developments) of key US state privacy laws, and several major foreign privacy laws such as the EU’s GDPR, China’s PIPL, Brazil’s LGPD, and more.

Course Prerequisites: No prior expertise is required or expected for the course.

Course Materials: Solove, Daniel J. and Paul M. Schwartz. Privacy, Law Enforcement, and National Security 3rd ed. New York: Wolters Kluwer, 2021. (Aspen Casebook Series) Paperback.


TNDY 407V – Urban Studies

Instructor: Heather E. Campbell, Professor, Department of Politics & Government
Term: Full
Section: 1
Units: 4
Instruction Mode: In-Person
Schedule: Thursday, 4:00 – 6:50PM

Cities represent about 2% of the world’s area, 50% of the world’s population, 75% of the world’s energy consumption, 80% of the worlds carbon emissions. This class will ground students in an understanding of: the development of cities, aspects of the contemporary city, basic understanding of systems thinking and the urban system, how cities are believed to grow (or not), and how we might measure the complex known as “cities.” Once we have those foundations, we will turn to a variety of topical urban policy issues, including environmental justice, public safety, public health, housing, etc., and how recent research addresses such urban policy issues. Studying cities is inherently transdisciplinary since the city is a complex system of systems—the economic system, the governmental system, the transportation system, the environmental system, the social system, the public health system.

By the end of this class, successful students will:

  1. Know major issues in urban studies, including social justice issues.
  2. Know of several elements of importance to livable cities.
  3. Understand something of systems thinking and why it is important to conceptualize cities as systems of systems.
  4. Know of a number of different methods used in studying urban issues including historical analysis, qualitative observational analysis, multivariate regression, GIS, and ABM.
  5. Develop and present a transdisciplinary, urban-issue “policy brief.”

TNDY 336 – Analysis of Social Networks

Instructor: Wallace Chipidza, Assistant Professor of Information Systems & Technology
Term: Full
Section: 1
Units: 4
Instruction Mode: In-Person
Schedule: Tuesday, 4:00 – 6:50PM

Description: This course explores the defining characteristics of social networks, how they form and evolve over time, and ultimately how they influence various outcomes of interest. We utilize a variety of quantitative techniques (e.g. social network analysis and exponential random graph modeling) to understand the structure, formation, and evolution of social networks. Students learn how to effectively visualize social networks of varying size, from small to very large. Students also learn statistical and machine learning techniques to understand how individuals influence each other’s behaviors and attitudes in these networks.

Rationale: Social networks – sets of people with shared relationships – are all around us. We participate in them when we choose friends, seek advice from workmates, lend and/or borrow money from financial institutions, donate to politicians, and so on. The positions we occupy in these networks, whether we know it or not, exert powerful influences on various important outcomes: happiness, job and career satisfaction, and substance abuse among others. Only by uncovering the full structure of these networks may we begin to understand some complex phenomena that require collaboration among disciplines: business, economics, politics, sociology, psychology, information systems, among others. Students taking this class will collaborate to investigate complex phenomena at the intersection of various disciplines, e.g. students from public health, psychology and economics might collaborate to investigate patterns of adoption of new illicit drugs, and students from information systems and politics may work together to understand the spread of political misinformation on social media.


TNDY 404O – Collaboration Across the Public-Private Divide

Instructor: Robert Klitgaard, University Professor
Term: Full
Section: 1
Units: 4
Instruction Mode: Online
Schedule: Thursday, 7:00 – 9:50PM

Description: This course explores how to design, lead, and manage public-private partnerships. We examine theoretical approaches from many disciplines, as well as experience from around the world, to analyze various forms of collaboration among governments, businesses, and citizens. We consider the practical challenges of making such partnerships work, using outstanding case studies. Along the way, we reconsider the meaning and practice of public policy and management. Examples are drawn from public health, education, international development, urban renewal, infrastructure, minimum-wage reforms, anti-corruption initiatives, and more.

Rationale: The most challenging problems facing our region and our world cannot be tackled by government alone. From health care to education, from poverty to social justice, from urban renewal to international development, progress requires collaboration across the public-private-nonprofit divide. Students will learn to: 1. Appraise the distinctive contributions of different kinds of organizations to address public policy issues. 2. Apply tools of leadership and management to public-private partnerships, including citizen empowerment. 3. Evaluate collaboration in terms of each partner, the partnership as an entity, and the attainment of public purposes. Along the way, students have the chance to reconsider deeper questions about entrepreneurship, leadership, and service.


TNDY 408T – Religion, Music and Culture in the Americas

Instructor: Daniel Ramírez, Associate Professor of Religion
Term: Full
Section: 1
Units: 4
Instruction Mode: In-Person
Schedule: Monday, 4:00 – 6:50PM

[These young Aztecs] sing the ancient songs they were wont to sing in the days of their idolatry–not all of them but many of them. And no one understands what they say as their songs are very obscure. And if, after their conversion here, they sing some songs they have composed which deal with the things of God and His saints, they are enveloped in many errors and heresies.

—Bernardino Sahagún, Historia general de las cosas de Nueva España

These introductory remarks to Bernardino Sahagún’s magnum opus, Historia general de las cosas de Nueva España (1579-1580), illumine the motives behind his creation of an orthodox Nahuatl-language liturgy in 1583, Psalmodía Cristiana, and the imprimatur of his project by the Third Provincial Council (1585) of the bishops of New Spain. The Franciscan friar’s concern over heterodox subterfuge in the musical and cultural spheres speaks to the centrality of these in religious history and experience and their potential to undermine, extend, preserve and change these. This course will assay a transdisciplinary exploration of the imbricated spheres of religion, music, and culture. Our principal approach will borrow from the transdiscipline of ethnomusicology to query the role of music in the social religious settings. After a theoretical grounding in cultural practice, we will study ethnomusicological case studies from the south Pacific, South Africa, and the Tejano borderlands. These will provide helpful comparative frames for our exploration of the question of musical and sonic spheres in: Mesoamerican Catholic contexts of evangelization and hybridity; transatlantic (including Caribbean) networks of Anglo-American Protestantism and African American Gospel; ethnic immigrant religious networks (Dutch Reform/German Lutheran and Methodist); heterodox traditions (Latter-Day Saints and Seventh-Day Adventists); old and new borderlands musics (from Penitentes to Pentecostals), and contemporary global Christian musics. We will also avail ourselves of musical and sonic archives from the Smithsonian Institution, Library of Congress, and several university-based collections, as we propose to approach (regional) religious communities/congregations in the capture, archiving, and interpretation of their religious cultural musical practice.

This course will help students achieve the following learning outcomes:

  1. Familiarity with major debates and research projects at the intersection of ethnomusicology and religious studies (both represent interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary fields);
  2. Critical reflection on the limits of traditional text-centric uni-disciplinary approaches and the opportunities presented by extra-textual transdisciplinary approaches;
  3. Engagement with and competency in the fields of ethnomusicology and religious studies through written work, oral presentation, and in-class presentation;
  4. Assay initial explorations into musical and sonic archival research and community engagement over these (keeping in mind ethical insights derived from 1), 2) and 3);
  5. Preparation for dissertation proposal projects (if so inclined)
  6. Sharpening of skills in critical reading, writing, thinking, and speaking.

TNDY 408E – Mechanisms That Rule Our Social Universe

Instructor: Joshua Tasoff, Associate Professor of Economic Sciences
Term: Full
Section: 1
Units: 4
Instruction Mode: In-Person
Schedule: Tuesday/Thursday 1:15 – 2:30PM

Billions of years ago, chemicals formed on planet Earth that could replicate themselves. These were the progenitors of life. Over eons of evolution, autonomous living agents predated, cooperated, and competed with each other to eventually create the modern world of today. Across that history, there have been several recurring themes on how agents interact. In the course we will study fundamental forces that drive sociality at multiple levels, from viruses to markets. We will uncover some of the hidden mechanisms that rule our social universe. For example, we will discover why genes form chromosomes, why people form nations, and why the reasons for the two are similar. The emphasis will be on a few key ideas that have broad and profound application. In our journey, we will learn from where social systems evolved and perhaps to where social systems may be evolving. This course is intended for students who are interested in having their perspective shifted through provocative frameworks (colloquially referred to as “blowing your mind”). Additional time will be devoted to professional self-examination and prioritization (colloquially referred to as “what the heck am I doing with my life?”).


Past Courses